On A Polaroid Saturday

I have been going to a local bookstore on occasion and selling pictures that I take of people with my Polaroid cameras. I never really make a lot of money, which is fine because I just enjoy doing it, but the coolest part about it is that you never know who you will meet. A guy walked into the store with a Polaroid pack camera and a Yashica Mat and my first thought was that he had known about the event and come to talk about cameras. He introduced himself as Nic Persinger and it just so happens that he was visiting and did not know about the event that I was doing, so it was ironic to meet another camera enthusiast. We swapped photos, I took one of him using my Polaroid Sun 600 LMS loaded with Impossible Project Film and he took one of me with his Polaroid pack camera.

Polaroid Saturday 1

Polaroid Saturday 2

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Light Is The Difference

Recently, I bought my first ever pack camera. I have used regular Polaroid cameras, but the Polaroid 450 was new to me. At first I was worried that it wasn’t working because an entire pack of film didn’t develop, that’s when I discovered the true reason that it wouldn’t take a photo. The battery was modded to work with 123 type batteries, so a battery was taped into the compartment and the white end wasn’t even connected. I have to hold the wired against the opposing ends of the battery to get a charge from it, but it works! Have a look at how the photos started, and to where they are at the more I used the camera. I think I have the hang of it now.

Polaroid 450 and Fuji FP-100c Polaroid 450 and Fuji FP-100c Polaroid 450 and Fuji FP-100c Polaroid 450 and Fuji FP-100c

I used Fuji FP-100c film in the camera and discovered pretty fast that indoor photos need to be done in really good light or using a tripod. I know, I know…that’s just common sense. I don’t like to use a flash when I take a photo, instead I like to use natural light if possible, like in the last photo. Overall, I am enjoying this camera a lot, flaws and all!

In An Instant

When I look back at all of the photos and memories that I created in 2013, it’s a little overwhelming. At moments I think I could have done more, and at other times I feel like what I have done was just enough (I suppose that’s something I’ll always have to contend with). What I am most proud of when looking through my photos, are the memories that I have thanks to these photos.

Recently, I have gotten into Polaroid photography (It was only a matter of time). It’s expensive, but there is a nostalgia that only a Polaroid photo can create, even if I wasn’t born when the original Polaroids were invented, I can still appreciate what they’ve done for the world of photography. So here are some Polaroid photos that I took using Impossible Project film and the SX-70 and Polaroid Sun 600 LMS. I am looking forward to making more memories, and hopefully living just a little more on the adventurous side than I did in 2013.

New Life To Old Moments

One of my favorite things about film photography is how it has lasted over the years. One generation can pass the tradition to another. Unfortunately, so many memories are lost when a person shoots a roll of film and never has it developed. On my film photography journey I have encountered a few opportunities to uncover some of those lost and forgotten film memories from the past.

A family member of mine recently found a few rolls of 110mm film in the attic of my Great Great Grandmother. They were in pretty rough condition and I was more than certain that dust had made its way down into the tiny compartments on the 110mm film canisters, but I decided to send them off for development anyway. After all, if any of the photos turned out at all then it would’ve been worth it!

Luckily, 90 photos were taken and developed! I was shocked at the quality, they still looked pretty great, especially considering their age and condition. Even though I wasn’t there to experience those moments, I knew I was viewing some pretty special photos.

Even though I don’t know the people in lots of those photos, it’s cool to see what my relatives say so many years ago. If you ever find old rolls of exposed film, don’t hesitate, have them developed!

A Cup of Yashica T4 Zoom

For some people coffee is a horrible black liquid that they try and avoid, but for the rest of the world that actually makes sense, coffee is a brilliant part of the day. I cannot get through the day without at least one cup of coffee. My addiction started when I was pretty young, but as you can probably tell, it set down the roots for making coffee a staple in my everyday routine. Wake. Coffee. Everything else. That’s sort of how I normally view my day.

So, would it not make sense for a person who has a passion for coffee to take pictures of their coffee? You’re right…it doesn’t really make that much sense, but somehow it works. I love seeing photos of coffee taken by friends and family, in fact one of my friends owns a website dedicated to coffee (I’m not even joking about that). For your viewing pleasure, some recent photos of coffee that I got a little creative with.

For me, it’s about the simplicity of forgetting everything else and letting your cares and worries melt into a cup of coffee. Those photos were taken on a nifty little Yashica T4 Zoom camera, 35mm son! I needed to test the camera out to see what kind of photos it took, and somehow coffee shots made it onto the roll, imagine that! I don’t know about you, but all of this talk about coffee has made me thirsty (I sound like an addict), so I’m going to go have a cup! Go have a cup of coffee on me!

Stick Around For The Unknown

TODAY is the LAST day of the summer program that I have been working with. I can’t say that I have too many “brilliant” photos from this summer, but then again, that all depends on your definition of the word. I have my car loaded up and am ready to go tonight after the day’s events. There are a few people that I will miss from the program and the students that I got the opportunity to work with were great. Take a look at these photos and get a sense of the mood of the program for me, it was mostly relaxing and enjoyable, save a few of the employees creating drama. Most of these were taken with my little buddy, the Olympus XA, using Lomography Color Negative 400 ISO film.

Alas, I must bid you au revoir. I am excited to be going back home to spend the last few weeks of summer at my new job as the editor of my colleges newspaper. I don’t doubt that it will be lots of work, but what worth doing isn’t?

Goodbye summer program, hello to the unknown.